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Archive for the ‘Kids and Reading’ Category

8 Tips To Raise A Confident Reader

December 19th, 2013 - Category: Kids and Reading


Building a child’s reading confidence can be quite challenging, since they’re more exposed to modern technology. However, reading is an important skill that children should learn and it helps build self-esteem. Now, to help parents develop their kids’ confidence in reading, here are eight tips for them:


1. Use Reading Apps

Books are still the best resource to teach a child how to read, but mobile applications offer interactive benefits to help reinforce healthy reading habits. A PBS 2013 study revealed that apps can help kids learn new vocabulary in just two weeks. Verizon’s Andrea Meyer said that parents can help their children practice reading through reading apps. In a feature she wrote, Meyer recommends Dr. Seuss’ e-books which includes stories like “The Cat in the Hat” and “Green Eggs and Ham.” Also, familiarizing them with mobile technology will prepare them for the digital future ahead.

2. Always Read Aloud

Readingaloud helps boost a child’s imagination and creativity. This develops their basic language skills, comprehension, and vocabulary. Aside from these, it also teaches them different emotions like joy, anger, fear, and sadness. Since children yearn for attention from their parents, reading aloud makes them feel wanted and safe. Once they’ve memorized those stories by heart, they would eventually become storytellers themselves.

3. Let Them Read to You

Sometimes, children can be overcome with shyness especially when reading in front of the class. To help them overcome their “stage fright,” they should be encouraged to read to their siblings or parents. This develops their confidence to face an audience and read without fear. Since reading is all about practice, parents can also set it as their kid’s personal goal. Using the My Job Chart app will help motivate them to accomplish their reading goal and earn reward points in the end.

4. Build a Library at Home

In an article published on Science Daily, it revealed that by having books can increase a child’s education level. It’s recommended that a common household should have at least 20 books for children to read. They’re also inexpensive investments which will help them better readers and writers. As Neil Gaiman said in his lecture at the Reading Agency: “we need our children to get onto the reading ladder: anything that they enjoy reading will move them up, rung by rung, into literacy.”

5. Books are Good for Bonding

Bonding over books is one of the best ways to build a child’s reading confidence. It would be nice if parents would share their favorite story or fairy tale with their kids. Tell them that these stories were also read to them by their parents or grandparents. They can also encourage them to share their favorite stories and discuss it with them. What lessons can they get from it? Was the villain really that bad?

6. Explore New Words with Them

Sometimes, a new book can intimidate kids especially if it has new words or phrases. They may feel that their parents are pushing them too hard. This shouldn’t be the case and the best way to do it is to explore it with them. Parents should let them feel that they’re there to learn with them. Become a team of word explorers and discover the magic behind them. Just make sure to do it slowly, otherwise it may turn them off.

7. Make Reading a Pleasurable Experience

Instead of letting them watch television or use their mobile devices to surf the Internet, encourage them to read.Readingshould bring them pleasure and excitement. It shouldn’t be a chore or an assignment. Show them that through reading, they can unlock new worlds, discover interesting characters, and learn new words. Make it interesting for them by making voices, acting lines out, and being funny. Once they’ve associated reading as a pleasurable experience, they’ll eventually fall in love with reading.

8. Let Them Choose the Books They Want to Read

Don’t limit their imagination to stories they’ve already read; let them choose their own stories instead. Ask them what interests them when visiting the local bookstore. If they’re interested in reading comic books, let them be. Whatever they want to read—as long as it’s age-appropriate—let them read it. It’s a good sign that they becoming intelligent and confident readers.


A home is the perfect place to help shape children into better people. By introducing books and reading with them, we are helping create innovative and worthwhile citizens.Readingleads to literacy and literacy leads to hope.


About the Author

Zoe Allen is an avid reader and free lance writer. Her favorite books include Neil Gaiman’s “M is for Magic” and Richard Adam’s “Watership Down.” Since Zoe’s also into technology, she often visits Verizon for the latest news. Follow her on Twitter.



Speaking to Read

December 5th, 2013 - Category: Kids and Reading




Reading is an important skill that will help your child succeed in school and throughout life.  But how and when do you start teaching your child to read?

Learning to read starts younger than you think.  Very young in fact, because learning to speak is actually the foundation for learning to read.  Children develop important language skills from birth – and early language abilities are directly related to later reading abilities.  The connections in the brain that develop when a child learns to talk are the same connectors that will help them learn to read. 

Did you know… At 4 -5 months old, a child can start to recognize their name.  At 8 months old a child can start to distinguish word patterns.  At 3 years old a child can start to repeat simple rhymes.  At 5 years old, a child can start to match sounds with letters.

So, to begin with, an easy way to help your child learn to read is to help them develop their language skills. 

Here are a few ideas to help build your child’s language proficiency and boost their reading abilities as well.


1.  Talk with your child.  Encourage them to answer and ask questions.  Instead of listening to the radio on the way to the store, turn it off and talk to them about their day, their favorites, their friends, etc.

2.  Point out and identify new objects around them.  Let them feel, taste, and smell the objects when appropriate for multiple sensory identification.   

3.  Sing with your child.  Many times a small child can repeat a long line of words in the form of song before they can speak a full sentence.  Sing them your favorite nursery rhymes or lullabies as they fall asleep.

4.  Make up rhymes with your child.  Be silly while teaching them how to rhyme.  They will love it!

5.  Tell them stories.  Ask them questions or make predictions about how the story will end. 

6.  Read them books.  Have them retell the story to you at another time.  Discuss story elements, cause and effect, orders found in the book, main ideas, characters, and details.

7.  If a child is interested in a certain book, read it over and over to them.  Point out words in the book as you read them.


Speaking and listening are the building blocks of early literacy.  Children whose parents read to them, tell them stories, talk and sing songs with them – develop larger vocabularies, become better readers, and do better in school.  So speak your way to reading with your child today.


7 Easy Ways to Improve Your Child’s Grades

November 13th, 2013 - Category: Kids and Reading


Helping you child put their best foot forward at school is a priority of every parent.  Do you know what book your child is reading in class, or when their science project is due?

Here are a couple pointers to help ensure their success at school.

1.  Be involved.  Talk to your child about their assignments, what’s going on in class, and how things are going with their friends.  Communicate with teachers as well to make sure assignments are getting done and behavior in class is appropriate.  Many schools have grades, attendance, and even behavior logs in the internet now.  Good communication is always the first step toward improvement.

2.  Make a homework spot.  Designate a place in the house for each child where they can do their homework.  It should be free of distractions and noise.  But make sure it’s a place close enough to where you will be so they can ask you for assistance if necessary.

3.  Uplift them.  When it comes to a child’s self-esteem, it takes 10 positive comments to make-up for just one negative one.  So instead of adding to the cruel comments that they may hear at school, give them uplifting, positive comments instead.

4.  Eat healthy.  Make sure everyone starts the day off with breakfast.  If possible, opt for something that is high in protein instead of a sugary, carb-loaded cereal or toaster pastry.  It will help satisfy them for longer and eliminate that mid-morning “blah” feeling.  Offer healthy options for lunch and dinner as well, and drink more water!

5.  Get moving.  Being more active will help not only their bodies but also their minds grow and develop.  It will also give them an opportunity to let off some steam and balance their bodies energy.

6.  Get a good nights sleep.  Recent studies show that most kids ages 2 – 18 need 10 hours of sleep a night.  I know what you’re thinking…impossible!  Right?  With busy schedules, getting just 8 hours is hard enough as it is.  Maybe your goal can be to simply increase it, even if just a little.  Turning off electronic devices earlier in the evening can help kids wind down faster.  Try reading a book as an alternative.

7.  Read a book.  Reading is the key to all learning.  Read to your children often and have them read to you.  Encourage them to always have a book that they are reading on the side.  Take them to the library and attend reading hours or book tours if possible.  You can even swap books with friends.  Use the books that you are reading to come up with places to visit or things to see or learn more about.  Make books fun.